Category Archives: Writing

New Book Release: The Good Child by S.C. Karakaltsas

We’re finally out of lockdown mark 6 in Melbourne and after three straight months I’m emerging into a social life and a little retail therapy.

It might look like I’ve spent my days reading and reviewing other people’s books, but in between I’ve been slowly and methodically and sometimes haphazardly writing another historical fiction novel.

It’s taken a little over three years and any writer will tell you that it’s hard work even with a pandemic to distract in between.

The cover was done by the brilliant, Anthony Guardabascio from Continue , and doesn’t it pack a punch of vibrant colour?

About The Good Child:

The Good Child is a compelling story of two very different women: 72-year-old Lucille, with a hidden tragic past, and 30-year-old Quin, whose ambitions lost her everything.

Everyone hates Lucille for what her son Tom, did and she can’t blame them. He’ll probably go to jail. She’s to blame too — she ignored all of his faults perhaps even encouraged them. She never wanted him in the first place. But that wasn’t her first mistake. She’d ignored her grandmother’s warning that if she married the man she loved, her life would be a disaster. She was right too.

Now Lucille’s on a train with no money and no home. All she’s left with is a blind overprotective love for her son, but even that is now pushed to the brink as she comes to terms with her actions and those of Tom’s.

Quin worked for Tom and knows exactly what he’s done because she helped him do it – she turned a blind eye to the corners he cut and the lies he told. Now, she’s lost everything and it’s her own fault. She wants revenge.

Then she meets Lucille on the train and finds herself facing her past and her future.

Rich in detail and epic in scope, The Good Child is a powerful novel of emotional and financial resilience, loss and unexpected friendship.

First Reviews

And the first reviews have started. Check out this lovely 5 Star review for The Good Child 

The Good Child is available on Amazon.com or Amazon.au

A Perfect Stone: Anniversary Special

It’s been two years since I launched my last book, A Perfect Stone and I’ve been very humbled by all the great feedback. To celebrate, and for those who love eBooks, A Perfect Stone has been heavily discounted until the end of the month at $ 0.99c at Amazon

Overview:
Living alone, eighty-year-old Jim Philips potters in his garden feeding his magpies. He doesn’t think much of his nosy neighbours or telemarketers. All he wants to do is live in peace.

Cleaning out a box belonging to his late wife, he finds something which triggers the memories of a childhood he’s hidden, not just from his overprotective middle-aged daughter, Helen, but from himself. When Jim has a stroke and begins speaking another language, Helen is shocked to find out her father is not who she thinks he is.

Jim’s suppressed memories surface in the most unimaginable way when he finally confronts what happened when, as a ten-year-old, he was forced at gunpoint to leave his family and trek barefoot through the mountains to escape the Greek Civil War in 1948.

A Perfect Stone is a sweeping tale of survival, loss and love.

Praise From Readers
***** “It is a story of loss and survival interspersed with the history of a war I knew little about. Highly recommended.”
***** “This is a fictional story but based on actual events, and the author wastes not a word in evoking sympathy for those most vulnerable members of society, without ever becoming maudlin.”
***** “A Perfect Stone is a moving story of childhood and old age set against the traumatic experiences of child refugees during the Greek Civil War.”
***** “I liked the switch in timelines and really enjoyed the writing. I was thoroughly immersed and couldn’t put it down. Highly recommended.”

Short listed for Book of the Month by Discovering Diamonds

Purchase Links

Amazon


Book Review: The Last Migration by Charlotte McConaghy — Theresa Smith Writes

This book has captured my imagination. Definitely one for my TBR. Check out the fantastic review by Therese Smith below and see if you think so too.

 

The Last Migration… About the Book: A dark past. An impossible journey. The will to survive. How far you would you go for love? Franny Stone is determined to go to the end of the earth, following the last of the Arctic terns on what may be their final migration to Antarctica. As animal populations […]

Book Review: The Last Migration by Charlotte McConaghy — Theresa Smith Writes

Winner announced for the 2020 International Booker Prize! — The Booktopian

I’m always interested in the Booker Prize winners and of course don’t always agree with the judges.
 
The Discomfort of Evening by Marieke Lucas Rijneveld is one for my TBR list.
 
 

The Discomfort of Evening by Dutch author Marieke Lucas Rijneveld is this year’s winning book. The post Winner announced for the 2020 International Booker Prize! appeared first on The Booktopian.

Winner announced for the 2020 International Booker Prize! — The Booktopian

PS. This isn’t the ManBooker Prize which is yet to be announced.

A Perfect Stone: Listed in Best New Greek Civil War Books to Read in 2020

I’m very excited that A Perfect Stone was selected as one out of eight top reads about the Greek Civil War for 2020 by Book Authority. You can check out the article here : https://bookauthority.org/books/new-greek-civil-war-books

A Perfect Stone is an historical fiction story about a boy’s journey across the mountains to escape the civil war. It’s available at many online bookstores including Amazon

Today, I’m featuring a guest post by Melbourne-based author AJ Collins, whose first book, a crossover YA/adult novel, Oleanders Are Poisonous, has just been released. A recipient of first prize and several commendations for the Monash WordFest awards, AJ has been published in various short story anthologies and magazines, and was awarded a place at […]

via Celebrating new books in troublesome times 3: AJ Collins — Feathers of the Firebird

Special Offer for A Perfect Stone

 

A special offer for A Perfect Stone on Kindle, only for a short time and only on Amazon. To take advantage of this massive discount on price, grab it now on Amazon

What’s it about?

Living alone, eighty-year-old Jim Philips potters in his garden feeding his magpies. He doesn’t think much of his nosy neighbours and dislikes telemarketers intensely. All he wants to do is live in peace.

Cleaning out a box belonging to his late wife, he finds something which triggers the memories of a childhood he’s hidden, not just from his overprotective middle-aged daughter, Helen, but from himself. When Jim has a stroke, Helen is shocked to find out her father is not who she thinks he is.

Jim’s suppressed memories surface in the most unimaginable way when he finally confronts what happened when, as a ten-year-old, he was forced at gunpoint to leave his family and trek barefoot through the mountains to escape the Greek Civil War in 1948.

What are readers saying?

Goodreads

FIVE STARS FOR A PERFECT STONE

“This is a fictional story but based on actual events, and the author wastes not a word in evoking sympathy for those most vulnerable members of society, without ever becoming maudlin.” Helen Hollick (Discovering Diamonds – shortlisted for book of the month July 19)

 ‘It is a story of loss and survival interspersed with the history of a war I knew little about. Highly recommended.’ Elise

“A Perfect Stone” is a vivid and engaging novel that brims with believable characters and a great deal of observational wisdom.” Clare

 ‘It brought me to tears in more than one passage,” Stephanie

“The story of young children – their exhaustion, hunger and ultimate survival is riveting. It makes me think differently about my neighbours – eastern European, Asian – of where they’ve come from and what they may have endured to get here.
I loved the writing and the fastidious research and simply couldn’t put it down.” Meredith

“I was thoroughly immersed and couldn’t put it down. Highly recommended.” Eugene

“A fictional story drawn from real experiences, Dimitri/Jim become stand ins for all children throughout history forced from their homes in time of war and destined never to be reunited with their birth families.” Chris